A co-worker recently made me aware of a 2007 social experiment done by The Washington Post in conjunction with Joshua Bell.  Naturally I had to investigate the truth of the e-mail I was sent and found an article on The Washington Post webpage that verified to validity (at least somewhat) of the e-mail.  Bell, a popular and incredibly talented violinist, was asked to dress modestly and play in a well-populated Washington, D.C. Metro Station during morning work rush hour.

 

The short clip published with the article portrays his beautiful artistry and the lack of public interest.  The experiment was to bring into question how people would respond.  The article written by Gene Weingarten presents a plethora of questions regarding the experiment:  “Do you stop and listen?  Do you hurry past with a blend of guild and irritation, aware of your cupidity but annoyed by the unbidden demand on your time and your wallet?  Do you throw in a buck, just to be polite?  Does your decision change if he’s really bad?  What if he’s really good?  Do you have time for beauty?  Shouldn’t you?  What’s the moral mathematics of the moment?”

 

I think that humans are inherently drawn to beauty but the demands of Continue reading “Everyday Beauty and Ignorance”